Physics Laboratory Experiment on Magnetic Induction and Magnetism
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Physics Laboratory Experiment on Magnetic Induction and Magnetism

The earliest sources of magnetism were magnets such as the famous loadstone of Magnesia. Many scientists began investigating the properties of magnetism associated with electric currents when they discovered that a compass needle is deflected by an electric current. One of the objective of this experiment is to differentiate magnetic induction from magnetism. Continue reading to know more.

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THEORY:

The discovery of the peculiar properties of a certain rock, called magnetite or lodestone, which was found in abundance in Magnesia, Asia Minor, opened a new world to man's progress in science. This mineral stone has the property of attracting pieces of iron and steel. This stone is called "magnet" as it was first discovered in Magnesia. It has been called a natural magnet and Its property of attracting pieces of iron and steel is known as magnetism.

When a bar magnet is made to attract a piece of nail and the end of the nail is placed in iron filings, the nail will attract the filings. The nail has become the magnet. If  a bar magnet is made to attract a big pieces of nail, the big pieces of nail could attract smaller pieces of nails. The big piece of nail has become a magnet. This process is known as magnetic induction.

OBJECTIVES:

  1. To differentiate magnetic induction from magnetism
  2. To test samples with a compass to know whether it is magnetized or not.

APPARATUS/MATERIALS:

Horseshoe magnet, bar magnet, 2.5 inch nail, thumbtacks, compass, thread, lead, copper nail, insulated wire, copper wire, metal paper clip, glass (tubing), washer, marble, coin, magnetic compass

PROCEDURE:

Part A.

  1. Get a magnet and attract a 2.5 inch nail.
  2. Scatter some thumbtacks on a piece of paper.
  3. Try to pick some of the thumbtacks.
  4. Try to remove gently the magnet  by holding the nail and observe.

Part B.

With the compass held level in your hand, try to orient its needle so that its pointer would coincide with the straight running from N to S. Get a bar magnet and put the magnetic compass near the four sides of the magnet. Illustrate the result.

Part C.

Suspend the bar or horseshoe magnet by a loop of thread such that it could swing freely. After it stop swinging with another magnet try to bring its pole near the suspended magnet and observe, then reverse the pole. Record our observations.

Part D.

Test the samples with a compass to make sure that it is not a magnet. Orient its needle so that it's pointer would coincide with the straight line running from North to South. Then one by one rub the sample to the surface of a permanent magnet for one second and test it with the magnetic compass. If the pointer of the compass moves, the sample is magnetized.

RECORD OF RESULTS:

Samples                                             Magnetized or Not Magnetized

  1. LEAD
  2. IRON NAIL
  3. COPPER NAIL
  4. INSULATED WIRE
  5. COPPER WIRE
  6. METAL PAPER CLIP
  7. GLASS (Tubing)
  8. WASHER
  9. COIN
  10. MARBLE

FOR DISCUSSIONS:

1.  Where do you think is the location of magnet that has the strongest attraction for a magnetic materials?

Ans.

2.  From Part A procedure, what can you conclude about losing magnetism?

Ans.

3.  Explain in your own words the difference between magnetism and magnetic induction.

Ans.

Prepared by:

          Jessie Agudo, B.S. Civil Engg'/Master of Arts in Teaching Mathematics

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Comments (3)

Thank you Jessie. Magnets do have healing powers. Sorry that I was in close close contact with Knoji these days. I always appreciate your friendship.

Outstanding and very impressive post!

Impressive article Jessie.

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